December 1 Live Show: How We Make Nature

An illustration of two white-tailed prairie hares - one brown and one white
Artwork by Amanda Schutz.

We’ve learned about building dams, juicing high bush cranberries, tracking grizzlies, and planting Capilano apricots. But now it’s time to ask the really big question: how do we make nature?

Chris Chang-Yen Phillips welcoming folks to the event (Photo: Mack Male)
Chris Chang-Yen Phillips at the Almanac (Photo: Mack Male)

Join us for an afternoon of short talks at a live recording of the podcast Let’s Find Out. Throughout this season of the podcast, we’ve answered listener questions about how humans and nature have shaped each other in Edmonton. At this event, we’ll share stories that’ll really make you think about how we create nature where we live, and you’ll have a chance to get your hands dirty playing around with visions of what our city could become.

When: Sunday, December 1
Doors will be open at 1:30 PM, and the event will begin at 2 PM.
Where: The Almanac on Whyte (10351 82 Avenue NW)
How much: $15
Where to buy tickets: Eventbrite

This event is presented by Taproot Edmonton, a member-supported home for curiosity-driven local journalism in the Edmonton area. Become a member and you’ll get a $5 discount on your ticket.

This event will be recorded for Let’s Find Out.

This event will also be a fundraiser for The Resilience Initiative (formerly known as The Rockies Institute).

We’ve been learning a lot this season about how climate change is already impacting humans and ecosystems in Alberta. TRI is an Alberta-based charitable organization that builds helps communities build resilience to climate change. They especially focus on partnerships with Indigenous communities, like this grasslands restoration project in Kainai First Nation.

You’ll be able to donate with cash or credit card at the door. Let’s put what we learned into action!

Speakers

Luke Wonneck smiles with a hat on outside
Luke Wonneck
Luke Wonneck first began to see the world as “multinatural” — rather than merely multicultural — during an MSc in Nature, Society, and Environmental Governance at the University of Oxford. Following this degree, Luke figured he was finished with academia and worked for three years with a small non-profit called the Agroforestry and Woodlot Extension Society, where he promoted agroforestry and implemented tree planting projects on farms across Alberta. During this time, Luke began to realize that broader trends in the homogenization of agricultural landscapes were leading to trees being cut down faster than they could be planted through his work. In response to this realization, Luke began a PhD in Sociology at the University of Alberta this fall, where he hopes to better understand how conventional agricultural practices become and persist as ‘conventional’.
Emily Riddle looks at the camera outside
Emily Riddle
Emily Riddle is nehiyaw from the Alexander First Nation. She recently relocated back to Treaty 6 and lives in amiskwaciwâskahikan (Edmonton). She is a researcher, writer, and library advisor. She sits on the board of advisors for the Yellowhead Institute, a First Nations policy think tank out of Ryerson University.
Stephen Raitz at Youthful Cities at Round House, McEwan University Edmonton for RBC
Stephen Raitz
Stephen Raitz is an Urban Planner in the Edmonton region and is a BIG FAN of our BEAUTIFUL CITY. He lives life to the max in the Queen Alexandra neighbourhood and is on the board of Paths for People, an organization that supports Edmontonians in building a more walkable and bike-friendly city that’s human-centered by design. Stephen can also be found running around the river valley’s many trails or performing improv with Rapid Fire Theatre.

The Almanac has one step at the front entrance, with easier access from the alley. This event is all ages, and drinks will be available at the bar. All-gender washroom facilities will be available.

Let’s Find Out is a member of the Alberta Podcast Network, powered by ATB.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.